EGG EDUCATION

What Are Pasture-Raised Eggs?

By Taylor Ray

Navigating the egg aisle is no walk in the park for even the savviest of shoppers. You aren’t alone if you’ve pulled out your phone to look up a frustratingly nondescriptive term mid stride before committing to a dozen eggs. As conscientious, informed consumers, we all deserve transparency. You surround yourself with people who match your energy, so why not ask for the same from your eggs? It’s the 21st century. Confusing, shady terms aren’t it. Cage-free doesn’t pass the vibe check. But what does? Read on to learn what pasture-raised means in the egg industry, what it looks like in practice, and how a pasture-raised approach differs from others such as cage-free and free range.

All eggs aren’t created equal

As is true of virtually every product we choose to purchase, there’s something consequential about the way a dozen eggs came to be. From the lifestyle of the hens to the management of the farmland, every individual element of the process has an impact both on our planet and on the quality of the egg. Do you remember cracking open your first Consider Pastures egg? It’s an unforgettable moment conducted by a thick, healthy shell, a substantial egg white that doesn’t spread across your pan like water, and a stunning amber yolk that’s hues away from what the eggs in that grey paper carton have to offer. Surprise! These markers of quality are all the result of a pasture-raised lifestyle.

What does pasture-raised mean?

In the egg industry, the term pasture-raised denotes a particular kind of lifestyle afforded to egg-laying hens. The word “afforded” is deliberate here because the vast majority of egg-laying hens in the United States aren’t even given the privilege of seeing sunshine. Pasture-raised isn’t one of the USDA’s regulated terms, so third-party certifiers are the determinants of today’s pasture-raised standards. Standards therefore vary from egg brand to egg brand, but the general meaning of the term is the same: pasture-raised hens are given the opportunity to roam on green, grassy pastures every single day. In general, every hen in a pasture-raised flock has anywhere from 35 to 108 square feet of pasture to herself. Third-party certifier Certified Humane requires the upper end of this scale for its pasture-raised certification. Benefits for the hens include healthier, more fulfilling lives; the ability to practice natural behaviors and instincts such as foraging, dust bathing, and perching; and a varied, species-appropriate diet.

How is pasture-raised different from cage-free and free range?

Cage-free and pasture-raised standards are night and day. While pasture-raised hens spend their days outdoors in the fresh air, cage-free hens are confined to a warehouse-esque barn and never see the light of day. Although it’s a step up from tiny, cramped cages, cage-free standards are nowhere near humane. Free range, on the other hand, is a responsible way to raise egg-laying hens. Free range standards stipulate that hens must have access to pasture on a daily basis, weather permitting. The major difference between free range and pasture-raised standards lies in the actual amount of pasture space designated to each hen. Per the USDA, there’s no minimum space requirement for free range hens. But in the case of third-party certifier Certified Humane, it’s 2 square feet.

The importance of third-party certifications

Unfortunately, scanning the egg aisle for a carton that proudly displays the term pasture-raised isn’t the end all be all of informed grocery shopping. Because the USDA doesn’t regulate the term, it’s essential to seek out third-party certifications. Even in the case of free range, the USDA isn’t nearly as stringent as most third-party certifiers, leaving the important work of recognizing and understanding specific standards up to the consumer. There are many third-party certifiers in the United States, but Certified Humane, Humane Farm Animal Care’s certification program, is arguably the most transparent, rigorous, and objective of its kind.

Our pasture-raised standards

Among many additional research-based requirements, Certified Humane sets the following standards for pasture-raised farms like Consider’s:

  • Pasture area must consist mainly of living vegetation
  • The pasture must be designed and actively managed to encourage birds outside and to use the area fully
  • The pasture must be rotated periodically; a written rotational grazing plan must be in place
  • Birds must be outdoors 12 months per year, every day for a minimum of 6 hours per day
  • There must be sufficient well-drained, shaded areas for hens to rest outdoors without crowding together
  • Cover, such as shrubs, trees or artificial structures, must be distributed throughout the pasture
  • The pasture area must include patches with loose substrate suitable for dust bathing
  • All birds raised on pasture must have access to fixed or mobile housing that keeps them dry and protects them from wind and from predators

Why Consider?

We’re fierce advocates for pasture-raised standards and firmly believe that they lay the groundwork for better business and the pinnacle of egg quality. However, our philosophy isn’t rooted in a simple “the more space, the better” argument. Consider this: with our food system in distress and our planet facing an environmental crisis, is it really ethical to lean on the notion that animal welfare is where responsible egg farming begins and ends? We don’t think so.

As part of their surrounding ecosystems, pasture-raised hens both affect and are affected by the land that they call home. Naturally, it matters what farmers do with that land. By coupling pasture-raised standards with the holistic practices and principles of regenerative agriculture, Consider Pastures farmers are putting pasture space to use in a deliberate, calculated way. Planting wildflowers to assist in pollinator health, increasing organic matter and carbon sequestration via strategic use of cover crops, and multi-species livestock integration are just a few of these efforts – efforts that actively renew and regenerate our farms’ pastures and land. So while pasture-raised standards are our foundation, we also believe that giving back to the earth is paramount to farming responsibly.

Comments

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  • Mark D August 18, 2021

    Great to see the high standards you have set for yourselves, and thank you for educating the public about the misleading information out there. I have been buying solely Certified Humane eggs for the past five years... for the same reasons you stated above. Keep up the good work, I will be buying your eggs starting today.

    • Taylor Ray August 26, 2021

      Sounds like you know your stuff, Mark. We tip our hats to you for doing the work that's needed to be a conscientious and educated consumer. Would love to hear your honest review of our eggs once you've tried them!

  • Sarag September 24, 2021

    Hello! So nice to find your eggs. I looked through your website but I didn’t see it - sorry if I missed it. What do you feed your hens? Thanks so much!

    • Taylor Ray October 18, 2021

      Fantastic question, Sarag! Our hens are pasture-raised, so they get most of their nutrients from plants and insects that they find out in the grass. We make sure they’re getting the right amount of nutrients by providing a supplemental feed that includes soybeans, corn, and plenty of greens.

  • Lowell Hoisington October 14, 2021

    I have read Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan. His chapters in a section entitled "Grass" detail one concept of regenerative agriculture. I'm wondering if your practices are in any way similar. They appear to be so. Your eggs are indeed exceptional. The packaging most attractive.

    • Taylor Ray October 18, 2021

      Hi Lowell! Yes, the concepts described in Michael Pollan's book and here at Consider Pastures are practically one in the same. In fact, regenerative agriculture has been around for much longer than either of us! This post by the National Farmers Union details the indigenous origins of the movement: https://bit.ly/3vpYfR5.

  • Amy December 1, 2021

    I LOVE everything about your brand. Except that you give the hens feed with soy 😭 please, please consider going soy free!! (Thank you for being honest in your response about the feed to the other person though; so many companies are not honest). If it were soy free, you’d be 💯!!!!! 👏🏻👏🏻

    • Eve Ryan March 4, 2022

      Hi Amy, While we respect that you feel this way about soy, we find that the feed we supplement the hens' grazing with best serves their needs at the moment. We'd also like to note that when hens digest these soybeans, their bodies metabolize the nutrients and change the protein structure into a form they can use. This means that by the time eggs are formed, soy phytoestrogen levels have declined. Let us know if you have any follow-up questions or concerns.

  • ruben December 8, 2021

    hi, are your hens that lay consider eggs fed chicken feed, and if so what is in it? thank you for your consideration

    • Eve Ryan March 4, 2022

      Our hens spend most of their day on spacious pastures where they like to forage, scratch, dust bathe, and exhibit other natural behaviors. They also have access to a spacious coop, which provides them shelter from inclement weather and is a safe space where they can access fresh feed and water whenever they please. Our hens are pasture-raised, so they get most of their nutrients from plants and insects that they find out in the grass. We make sure they’re getting the right amount of nutrients by providing a supplemental feed that includes soybeans, corn, and plenty of greens. Feel free to hit us with any follow-up questions you may have!

  • Chantilly Alberti December 10, 2021

    Hi, what do the chickens eat? Any corn or soy? Is their diet organic or not? Anything GMO? Thanks!

    • Eve Ryan March 4, 2022

      Hello Chantilly, Our hens are pasture-raised, so they get most of their nutrients from plants and insects that they find out in the grass. We make sure they’re getting the right amount of nutrients by providing a supplemental feed that includes soybeans, corn, and plenty of greens. Our hens spend most of their day on spacious pastures where they like to forage, scratch, dust bathe, and exhibit other natural behaviors. They also have access to a spacious coop, which provides them shelter from inclement weather and is a safe space where they can access fresh feed and water whenever they please. This supplemental feed is not certified organic, and therefore, our eggs are not certified organic. Organic certification isn’t something we’re actively pursuing, but it’s certainly something we’ll remain open to for the future.

  • Julie December 13, 2021

    Is the corn and soybeans in the supplemental feed organic?

    • Eve Ryan March 4, 2022

      Hi Julie, Our feed is not certified organic. Organic certification isn't something we're actively pursuing at the moment, but are open to considering for the future. Feel free to ask us any follow-up questions!

  • Khristina January 1, 2022

    It is great that your hens feed on natural foods such as grasses and insects but, why must you feed your hens soybeans, and corn? Does this not defeat the purpose of raising healthy hens? I recently purchased your eggs but, now I hesitate to eat them.

    • Eve Ryan March 4, 2022

      Hey there Khristina, While it might seem ideal to raise hens who only eat what they find outside, unfortunately hens cannot subsist solely on what they eat outside. Especially due to the changing seasons on a lot of our farms, a supplemental diet is absolutely necessary to ensure that our hens are getting all the nutrients they need to be healthy hens, and in turn, produce healthy eggs. It is understandable to have a concern about corn and soy being included in the feed, as many people these days are trying to limit their corn and soy intake. We'd like to clarify that when hens digest both corn and soybeans, their bodies metabolize the nutrients into protein/carbohydrate structures that work well for their nutritional systems. By the time the eggs are formed, there are no traceable amounts of corn or soy in them. We hope this addresses your concerns adequately, but if you have any follow-up questions, we welcome them.

  • Maree Macpherson January 4, 2022

    My mother raised chicken in The Sudan and Zambia and I remember the delicious taste of the eggs. Later I had my own chickens in Italy - my daughter still remembers the taste if the eggs we received especially from our favourite chicken and she would say now a days in US « It doesn’t taste like Chuki’s ». I have just found your Consider eggs in the local supermarket and am delighted with your philosophy which I support and the taste of your eggs! Thank you.

    • Eve Ryan March 4, 2022

      Hey Maree, Thank you for sharing your story with us! We're humbled that a world traveler such as yourself would find our eggs up to her standards. We hope your daughter will enjoy them as well. Here's to high-quality eggs that always taste like Chuki's!

  • KAREN January 13, 2022

    Great read! Thanks for describing the perfect egg, including the thick shell as a sign of good hen health. I have seen too many instances where someone complains about quality and mentions thin shells. I try to ask them to bring that to the farm's attention, they may need to rest or nourish their hens. I am buying Consider eggs for the first time and I am actually excited about an egg!

    • Eve Ryan February 25, 2022

      Hey Karen, We are excited for you! We're always delighted to provide egg education because, here at Consider, we feel strongly that our consumers should be empowered with knowledge about the food choices they're making. It is also heartening to read how much you care about hen health. That's something that's close to our hearts here as well, and just as important as the production of high-quality eggs. Thank you for leaving us these kind words, and we hope you enjoy our eggs for years to come.

  • Michael McCammon January 14, 2022

    Please , in detail, describe what happens to male chicks on your “ small farm” affiliates. You don’t get a “ pass “ if the answer is that they are taken offsite and “ processed “. I’m looking for cutting edge products that prevent male eggs from hatching

    • Eve Ryan February 25, 2022

      Hey there Michael, This topic means a lot to us, and it's clear that it means a lot to you. We're all about transparency here at Consider Pastures, so naturally, we never pass on an opportunity to discuss the ins and outs of our farms. You might have noticed that we mention the phrase "care, cultivate, consider" on our cartons - that's because those principles play a huge part in everything we do. First, a bit of background: our pasture-raised hens come into our partner farmers' care at 16 weeks or so. Prior to that, their first days of life start in hatcheries before they're moved to small family farms that raise them in pasture-raised pullet houses. In the U.S., hatcheries are usually owned and operated by companies that own the rights to the genetics of the hen breed(s) that they hatch, so egg producers like us that require a particular hen breed don't have nearly as many options when it comes to choosing which hatcheries we work with as, say, a backyard chicken enthusiast or micro-farm might have. That said, we do our research and due diligence before starting a relationship with a hatchery. As you probably know, the unfortunate truth is that there's no role for male chickens in egg farming. Some hobby farms keep a rooster or two, but even the smallest backyard flocks can only handle so many male chickens without the risk of inadvertently creating an inhumane environment for their hens. The current norm at most hatcheries is to euthanize male chicks using one of the practices recommended by the American Veterinary Medical School Association. With no alternative at the moment, we unfortunately have no say over which practices these hatcheries use. That said, we're not about passing the blame. And luckily, huge strides are being made overseas in the hen genetics industry with resounding support from U.S. egg producers like ourselves. In-egg technologies used to identify the sex of the chick before it hatches are progressing rapidly in testing, as is research in the field, so the future is promising. As for Consider Pastures, we plan on continuing to support the eventual implementation of these changes in the U.S., with the goal of cultivating a more considered and care-focused industry from the inside out.

  • Tanya January 22, 2022

    I love your detailed information about raising your hens and the life they get to live, as well as the standards you live up to. However, it is disappointing to read in the comments that they receive supplemental food to include soybeans and corn. I believe it is extremely important to take care of our earth, it’s just as important to be mindful of the foods that are eaten by the animals we consume. Soybeans and corn are foods we shouldn’t be consuming.

    • Sarah March 8, 2022

      Hello Tanya, thank you for reaching out and letting us know your thoughts. Corn and Soy are fairly common in hen feed because they are readily available and ensuring that our hens receive enough protein and carbohydrates to stay in good health is very important to us. We're certainly open to suggestions and appreciate the feedback. We're happy to pass it along to our farmers.

  • Kim Schroter January 24, 2022

    Are these eggs gmo free and soy free?

    • Eve Ryan February 25, 2022

      Hi there Kim, Our eggs are not certified organic, therefore we cannot guarantee that they are GMO-free. Our hens are fed a supplemental feed that does include soybeans, which is an excellent extra source of protein for hens. Feel free to leave us any follow-up questions or concerns!

  • Jain Malkin January 28, 2022

    We just discovered your eggs at Whole Foods and I must compliment you on the outstanding and innovative product design of your box as well as the graphic design. There has never been anything like this in the market. This explanation on your website of the various terms is so helpful as I now know what to look for in case they stop selling your eggs. I am going to send your website link to many friends.

    • Eve Ryan February 24, 2022

      Hey Jain, Thank you for these kind words and for supporting regenerative agriculture! We sincerely hope you can always find our eggs at your Whole Foods, but if that's ever not the case, feel free to drop us a line and we'd be happy to look into it for you: hello@considerpastures.com We're humbled that you're willing to spread the word about us and we're grateful for it.

  • NANCY E January 30, 2022

    I love your eggs! I wanted to ask about the supplemental corn and soy, since some feed is laced with Round Up by farmers to facilitate an easier harvest, especially corn. Can you reassure me that this is not being fed to your hens? Thank you.

    • Sarah March 8, 2022

      Hello Nancy, thank you for the question. The supplemental feed our hens receive is not certified organic, and therefore, our eggs are not certified organic, so we cannot guarantee that the corn in the feed is not sprayed. As far as the hens' pastures, our farms do not spray any of the fields. Organic certification isn’t something we’re actively pursuing, but it’s certainly something we’ll remain open to for the future.

  • Diane Johnston February 20, 2022

    You mention that their diet is supplemented with soy, corn and greens..is any of this gmo? thank you

    • Eve Ryan February 24, 2022

      Hi Diane, Our feed isn't certified organic, which means that it also can't be guaranteed to be GMO-free. Organic certification isn't something that we're actively pursuing, but it's something we remain open to considering in the future. We look forward to answering any follow-up questions you might have.

  • Jenny February 21, 2022

    Hi, I was wondering is when you feed them with soybeans, corn and whatever you give to them to ensure they have the proper nutrition you use organic products, which I think it is very important when you use soy and corn… Thanks. You are doing and amazing Job

    • Eve Ryan February 24, 2022

      Hi Jenny, Thank you for this thoughtful question and your kind words as well. Our hens spend most of their days on spacious pastures where they like to forage, scratch, dust bathe, and exhibit other natural behaviors. They also have access to a spacious coop, which provides them shelter from inclement weather and is a safe space where they can access fresh feed and water whenever they please. This supplemental feed is not certified organic, and therefore, our eggs are not certified organic. Organic certification isn’t something we’re actively pursuing, but it’s certainly something we’ll remain open to for the future. Feel free to reach out to us with any other questions.

  • Kellie Joy O’Brien February 24, 2022

    Hi, I'm pleased to see that you treat hens humanely. I am wondering about how you source your hens? Does your company still participate in chick culling? Thanks, Kellie

    • Eve Ryan February 24, 2022

      Hi Kellie, This topic means a lot to us, and it's clear that it means a lot to you. We're all about transparency here at Consider Pastures, so naturally, we never pass on an opportunity to discuss the ins and outs of our farms. You might have noticed that we mention the phrase "care, cultivate, consider" on our cartons - that's because those principles play a huge part in everything we do. First, a bit of background: our pasture-raised hens come into our partner farmers' care at 16 weeks or so. Prior to that, their first days of life start in hatcheries before they're moved to small family farms that raise them in pasture-raised pullet houses. In the U.S., hatcheries are usually owned and operated by companies that own the rights to the genetics of the hen breed(s) that they hatch, so egg producers like us that require a particular hen breed don't have nearly as many options when it comes to choosing which hatcheries we work with as, say, a backyard chicken enthusiast or micro-farm might have. That said, we do our research and due diligence before starting a relationship with a hatchery. As you probably know, the unfortunate truth is that there's no role for male chickens in egg farming. Some hobby farms keep a rooster or two, but even the smallest backyard flocks can only handle so many male chickens without the risk of inadvertently creating an inhumane environment for their hens. The current norm at most hatcheries is to euthanize male chicks using one of the practices recommended by the American Veterinary Medical School Association. With no alternative at the moment, we unfortunately have no say over which practices these hatcheries use. That said, we're not about passing the blame. And luckily, huge strides are being made overseas in the hen genetics industry with resounding support from U.S. egg producers like ourselves. In-egg technologies used to identify the sex of the chick before it hatches are progressing rapidly in testing, as is research in the field, so the future is promising. As for Consider Pastures, we plan on continuing to support the eventual implementation of these changes in the U.S., with the goal of cultivating a more considered and care-focused industry from the inside out. Please let us know if you have any follow-up questions.

  • Liesbeth March 22, 2022

    Love the packaging! I'm curious, though — why is organic certification something you're not actively pursuing? Regenerative is awesome, but without being organic, it feels lacking

    • Ryan Assarian March 22, 2022

      Hi Liesbeth, We're thrilled to be partnering with each of our Consider Pastures farmers to rebuild soil health through regenerative practices. With all the time and resources dedicated to transitioning and maintaining each of our partner farms to adhere to wholistic farming practices like multi-species systems and cover crops, pursuing organic certification for our farms isn't currently at the top of our list. We're always open to the idea in the future, and we'll certainly share your sentiments with the rest of the team.

  • דירות דיסקרטיות בתל אביב March 26, 2022

    Very good write-up. I absolutely love this website. Continue the good work!

    • Eve Ryan April 4, 2022

      Thank you for these kind and thoughtful words! We appreciate all the support.

  • Melissa March 27, 2022

    Hi there, I'm doing research on your farms and your company. I'm encouraged by your pasturing practices for your hens. I have a few questions: 1. What happens to your hens when they're past laying? How are they treated/processed? 2. Do your chicks arrive at your farms with their beaks trimmed?

    • Sarah March 30, 2022

      Hello Melissa, thank you for reaching out to us. We're happy to answer your questions. At the end of a flock’s natural laying cycle, we contract with several poultry transportation and processing companies to purchase our hens. These companies send trained and certified humane handling poultry crews to our farms to pick up the hens. At this point, the hens belong to that company, but we have worked with them to ensure that our birds are going to acceptable follow-on markets; typically federally-inspected processing plants that specialize in processing laying hens for food production. For consumers who want eggs from hens that are never slaughtered, we understand that our eggs will not be a suitable option. If you fall in that boat, we’re happy to point you in the direction of our favorite resources for backyard chicken-keeping, and we’re always open to offering advice. Secondly, We do follow a practice accepted and recommended by Certified Humane, our third-party animal welfare certifier, of mild beak trimming. This is not for our financial benefit, but for protecting the weakest members of our flocks. The beak trim has traditionally been administered by trained professionals at our small family pullet farms under Certified Humane guidelines. A great resource for more detailed information about beak trimming standards can be found at Certified Humane’s website here: https://certifiedhumane.org/beak-trimming/ Please let us know if we may answer any additional questions for you.

  • Jeff M April 7, 2022

    Your guys marketing is on point! Only problem is I am looking for some pictures of your Regenerative farms and pastured egg layers and they are nowhere to be found. If you are just another marketing gimmick trying to make a buck on the pasture and regenerative label then it'll be short lived. If you can't tell this whole false marketing thing is really annoying after having been tricked/lied to several times already. Access to pasture is not pasture raised. You should be fully transparent and show pictures of your farms all the time if your birds are truly raised different. Otherwise hopefully the brand lasts long enough to pay off that pearl fisher bill cause they crushed it.

    • Ryan Assarian April 8, 2022

      We hear you! That's why we're thrilled to feature footage of our regenerative farms over on Instagram (@considerpastures)

  • Geralyn Starrantino April 10, 2022

    Thank you for the lovely explanation! I picked up a dozed last month in a local store... loved the packaging ( Could not help it as I am a visual coordinator-home-designer) ... I will recycle for the seeds I will be growing shortly! The eggs are delicious and yes, the harder shell and beautiful yolk/ whites are no comparison to all the other eggs. Thank you and I will be thrilled to share with many!

  • Gary Meixner May 4, 2022

    My father was a chicken farmer when he came from Austria at age 12. I listened to what he had to say to me. I have a photo of him holding a chicken. He loved chickens. I can send you the photo of him and his chicken. I wish I could have chickens to raise. I am 71 now and still trying to eat right. I discovered your eggs in Whole Foods and bought them. I live on a limited income income so I have to make every purchase with do I buy food or gas. Thanks for listening. Gary Meixner.

    • Sarah May 5, 2022

      Hello Gary. What wonderful memories you have of your father and his chickens. We hope seeing and experiencing our eggs and our farming philosophy has helped to bring these good memories back and made you smile. We'd absolutely love to see a photo of your father holding a chicken. Feel free to drop us a line at hello@considerpastures.com any time!

  • shoyaatlanta com May 13, 2022

    I believe this is one of the such a lot significant info for me. And i'm happy studying your article. But should observation on few basic issues, The website style is wonderful, the articles is really excellent : D. Excellent job, cheers

    • Ryan Assarian May 16, 2022

      We are so happy to hear that you are enjoying all the things we are doing here at Consider Pastures!

  • Miaoyong Cao May 24, 2022

    Hi, The egg is really good we like it.

    • Ryan Assarian May 24, 2022

      Hi Miaoyong, Thank you for your kind words! We truly appreciate it when our consumers can spot the difference between our small farm, pasture-raised eggs versus typical factory-farmed eggs. Every egg can make a difference for our farmers, our Earth, and our hens! Thanks for all the support!

  • Patricia Brown May 25, 2022

    Do you color your shells? Some companies shell color comes off during the boiling process.

    • Ryan Assarian May 25, 2022

      Thank you for taking the time to reach out. We’re incredibly sorry for any concern that our eggs may have caused you, and would like to take a moment to explain this phenomenon. Do you happen to add vinegar or salt to the water when you boil your eggs? If so, we’d like to take this opportunity to discuss the effect that vinegar has on egg shells. When any breed of hen begins to form an egg, it always starts out as a white egg. The addition of pigment (color) to the protective outer shell of the egg is the last step of the egg formation processes. This layer is calcium based and alkaline. Vinegar is a weak acid, so if eggs are boiled in acidic water, it can soften the pigment layer of the shell. Sometimes you may see this happen to some eggs and not others depending on the amount of vinegar used, the amount of pigment making up the outer layer of the shell, or other variables. Depending on the base pH of your water, this can also occasionally happen even without the addition of any salt or vinegar. We apologize for any alarm this may have caused and hope we have helped explain what you noticed. Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any further questions.

  • Dee-Dee Taylor May 31, 2022

    I’ve been buying Certified Humane eggs exclusively for many years now, and I’m so happy to have happened onto Consider Pastures in a StopnShop of all places! I fell in love with your eggs the moment I saw that lovely box; turns out, yours are the most beautiful and nutritious eggs I’ve ever encountered. Ever. Thank you, thank you. Aside from an occasional egg I am vegan, but my husband eats eggs every morning, so I’m incredibly happy to find you guys, now knowing that our eggs come from truly happy hens. Best wishes, Dee-Dee

    • Sarah May 31, 2022

      Thank you for your kind words, Dee-Dee! We truly appreciate it when our consumers can spot the difference between our small farm, pasture-raised eggs versus typical factory-farmed eggs. Every egg can make a difference for our farmers, our Earth, and our hens! Thanks for all the support!

  • Tony June 19, 2022

    Not sure of myself missed it are they organic never anything used like antibiotics etc. Is what do they eat is organic. A lot more information not so much about saving are earth I care for it yet we come first both.thank you kindly more information exact .sorry to say whom did this for you did not well inform your customers so much completely competitive company's make your site more user Friendly as disabled people not just physically as well mentally

    • Sarah June 20, 2022

      Hello Tony, thank you for the question and comment. Our hens spend most of their day on spacious pastures where they like to forage, scratch, dust bathe, and exhibit other natural behaviors. They also have access to a spacious coop, which provides them shelter from inclement weather and is a safe space where they can access fresh feed and water whenever they please. This supplemental feed is not certified organic, and therefore, our eggs are not certified organic. Organic certification isn’t something we’re actively pursuing, but it’s certainly something we’ll remain open to for the future. Please let us know if we can answer any additional questions for you!

  • Daniel June 29, 2022

    Are they corn and soy free?

    • Sarah June 30, 2022

      Hello Daniel, Our hens are pasture-raised, so they get most of their nutrients from plants and insects that they find in the grass. We make sure they’re getting the right amount of nutrients by providing a supplemental feed that does include soybeans, corn, and plenty of greens. Let us know if you have any follow-up questions for us!

  • Ken July 12, 2022

    I want to say thank you for being open and honest in this comment section about the process of Consider's egg farming, even in the case of controversial topics such as the contents of chicken feed, separating male chicks, etc. It makes your company trustworthy, which is seemingly rare. I am happy to continue supporting you by purchasing your products.

    • Glenda July 15, 2022

      Could you please clarify re the soy and corn? Is it non-GMO feed? of course you have made it clear that it is not organic, but as you know, the non-GMO project certifies non GMO.

    • Sarah July 18, 2022

      Hello Glenda, You are correct that the supplemental feed our hens receive is not certified organic, and therefore, our eggs are not certified organic at this time. We do believe that as a company, we have a mission to improve our land and environment for future generations. Some call it regenerative agriculture. Others call it place-based farming. Whatever you call it, it’s all about considering what’s around you. We believe that giving back to the earth is paramount to farming responsibly. We're proud to say that we have made a great start in the right direction, but we realize we're not done yet. Organic certification actually is something we’re actively pursuing in the future, but it is something that takes time to implement and become certified in. Our brand is new to the market, so extremely helpful feedback like yours will help make these changes a reality as we move forward. Thank you for taking the time to tell us what is important to you as we move forward toward a kinder, more considered world. Please know that we will make sure to let our team know your thoughts as well. Please don't hesitate to reach out, we're happy to continue the conversation.

  • Anne Theriault August 12, 2022

    Oh, thank you, Lord. I pray their business changes the environment. Bless You for providing them.

    • Eve Ryan August 12, 2022

      Hello Anne, Thank you for these kind and thoughtful words. We certainly hope that we're doing some good in this world, and providing people with high-quality eggs!

  • zoritoler imol September 8, 2022

    I like this post, enjoyed this one regards for posting.

    • Eve Ryan September 9, 2022

      We're happy to spread the good word! Glad you enjoyed this article, and let us know if you'd like to hear more about our eggs. We also have several other informative articles to peruse on the website here, if you're interested in doing some more reading!

  • Marianne Moyers September 8, 2022

    What supplemental feed is used to feed the chickens on the rainy or very cold days when they do not want to be outside in the pasture?

    • Eve Ryan September 9, 2022

      Hello Marianne, This supplemental feed is not certified organic, and therefore, our eggs are not certified organic. Organic certification isn’t something we’re actively pursuing, but it’s certainly something we’ll remain open to for the future. We're happy to answer any other questions you might have, so send them our way! You're welcome to email us at: hello@considerpastures.com!